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Broward County > Hurricane > A-Z Hurricane Guide > Electronics and Appliances


  Before The Event     During The Event     After The Event     Resources  

Before the Event

  • Install surge protectors to provide greater protection for your appliances and help prevent damage from lightning.
  • Unplug unnecessary appliances.

Refrigerators

  • Eat perishables or clean out food that may spoil during a power outage.
  • Turn refrigerators and freezers to maximum cold settings and open only when necessary.
  • If power goes out, many refrigerated foods will last only a couple of hours. Foods that need to be discarded after warming above 40 degrees include: mayonnaise, eggs, opened baby formula, luncheon meat, cooked vegetables, milk, cream, spaghetti sauce, cooked pasta, creamy salad dressings, cream-filled pies or pastries, cooked meat, canned meats that require refrigeration and soft cheeses, such as cream cheese, cottage cheese and mozzarella.
  • Foods still safe above 40 degrees include: fresh fruits, raw vegetables, peanut butter, jelly, barbecue sauce, ketchup, olives, fruit pies, bread, butter and margarine, and hard cheeses, such as cheddar, Swiss and Parmesan.

Freezers

  • Food in a fully packed freezer will keep one to two days if the power goes out.
  • Food is safe to refreeze if it does not get warmer than 40 degrees. 
  • If frozen food warms above 40 degrees, dispose of it.
  • If the power goes out, you can try to keep your freezer cold a while longer by covering it with several blankets.
  • Fill your freezer with extra water jugs or crumpled paper to keep it tightly packed. This will help preserve food for up to two days without electricity.

 
Updated october 2013


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