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  Before The Event     During The Event     After The Storm     Resources  

Before the Event

Top Tips

  • Make sure all vehicles you plan to use after the hurricane have a full tank. Remember: when there is no electricity, gas pumps won't work.
  • Have a few gas cans around and fill them if you can. If you have a generator, even a small one, you are going to need gas for it.
  • If you need to store gasoline before a storm, don't store it inside your home or garage. Place it outside, away from the sun. Use a rope to tie the storage containers together.
  • If the container or gas tank will not be used right away, will be exposed to sunlight, or will be stored at temperatures above 80 degrees Fahrenheit much of the time, add a fuel stabilizer/additive to the gasoline when you first buy it, prior to storage. These additives can be found at auto parts stores.

Storing generator gasoline can be tricky and dangerous. Fire officials say the best course is to use the generator gasoline in your car after the storm passes, and get more fuel when the storm threatens. Experts say if you choose to store gasoline, you need to realize it is one of the most dangerous substances you will have at your home, and balance the risk of having a highly explosive chemical in your property versus the reward of not having to refill the tanks when a storm threatens.

Updated May 2013

 


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