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  Before The Event     During The Event     After The Event     Resources  

After the Event

Things you should know:

  • When the power is out and the air conditioner is not working, moisture can get into a home and breed mold. 
  • Mold can cause health problems, especially for individuals with asthma or respiratory problems. It's important to start removing the mold as soon as possible. 
  • The cost to clean up the mold may not be covered by your insurance.
  • If you have electricity, use a wet/dry shop vacuum to remove the water.
  • Place large fans and a dehumidifier in the affected area. Using a fan without a dehumidifier can actually put more moisture in the air.
  • Use fans at open windows or doors. Be sure they blow outward, not inward, to avoid spreading the mold.
  • Once excess water is removed, keep your windows closed and the air conditioner on. Set your air conditioner to 80 degrees to encourage evaporation of moisture. A lower temperature will develop condensation, which means more moisture.
  • If you have no electricity to power fans or dehumidifiers, remove any absorbable materials that became wet (rugs, drapes, etc.). Use a broom to sweep water out of your home. Check the base of each wall for moisture.
  • Don't be reluctant to throw out water and mold-damaged items that are replaceable. If in doubt, throw it out, including carpeting, padding and even ceiling tiles. If drywall has absorbed water, cut out 12 inches above the water level and replace it once the room is dried out.

Updated March 2013

 


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